Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Published by: Kowsar

Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain

Shun Muramatsu 1 , Seiji Shiraishi 1 , Kanako Miyano 1 , Yuka Sudo 1 , 2 , Akiko Toda 3 , Masayuki Mogi 3 , Mayumi Hara 4 , Akinobu Yokoyama 1 , 2 , Yoshihiko Kawasaki 4 , Mikio Taniguchi 4 and Yasuhito Uezono 1 , 5 , 6 , *
Authors Information
1 Division of Cancer Pathophysiology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan
2 Division of Molecular Pathology and Metabolic Disease, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Japan
3 Pharmacokinetics and Bioanalysis Center, Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd., Wakayama, Japan
4 Division of Research and Development, Showa Yakuhin Kako Co., Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan
5 Division of Supportive Care Research, Exploratory Oncology Research and Clinical Trial Center, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan
6 Innovation Center for Supportive, Palliative and Psychosocial Care, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan
Article information
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine: February 01, 2016, 6 (1); e32873
  • Published Online: January 17, 2016
  • Article Type: Research Article
  • Received: September 1, 2015
  • Revised: October 10, 2015
  • Accepted: October 12, 2015
  • DOI: 10.5812/aapm.32873

To Cite: Muramatsu S, Shiraishi S, Miyano K, Sudo Y, Toda A, et al. Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain, Anesth Pain Med. 2016 ; 6(1):e32873. doi: 10.5812/aapm.32873.

Abstract
Copyright © 2016, Iranian Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ISRAPM). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Materials and Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Acknowledgements
Footnotes
References
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Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 4.0 International License .

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